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How to Find the Best Daycare for your Child with Autism

daycare autism

 

 

 

As summer draws near and you go back to work, you need to search for childcare for your little one with autism. This includes finding someone who provides reliable, devoted, and quality care for your child. Having a child with special needs makes searching for someone even more complex: you may have to ask more questions to find the right person who matches your requirements. So how do you find the best daycare for your child with autism?

Find a Daycare that Specializes in Autism

You’ll want to find a childcare provider who has familiarity working with kids with special needs, who comprehends the different challenges involved, and who knows how to adjust activities as needed. Most importantly, you’ll want to find someone who you know you can trust. You’re not alone. We understand that this is a tough decision to make.

Ask the Daycare Provider Questions

Above all, you should search for premium childcare that offers receptive attentiveness that positively acknowledges variances in children’s capabilities, concentrations, and proficiencies. The emphasis should be on care and activities that are tailored specifically to your child, with an environment that mixes predictability and scheduling with activities that are fresh and stimulating.

There are three key elements that you should evaluate when looking at a daycare for your child with special needs. The first is safety. Ask yourself if the environment is safe for your child’s abilities. The second is structure. Is the setting too constricting or too unstructured for your child? Lastly, you need to assess regulation. How will this person discipline your child and manage your child’s behavior challenges? Look for a provider who wants to collaborate with you to develop the best match for your child. It’s particularly significant for you as a parent to partner with your provider, as well as teachers, community resources and professionals in special-needs arenas, to make sure that everyone has a clear picture of your requirements and the needs of your child.

Find Dependable Daycare Sources

When you’ve established the type of caregiving your child with autism necessitates, begin your search by finding the special needs community in your area and asking questions. Usually, you will find that there are other parents who have valuable information about local resources. However, remember that every child is different, and what is right for another parent’s special needs child may not be a fit for yours.

When in doubt, speak with a professional agency, one that has a lot of experience with children with autism. Meet the daycare provider in person, ask many questions, and request verification for state and federal compliance and licensing.

In-Home Caregivers and Special Needs Daycare Centers

The most optimal choice is in-home care for your child with autism. A credible agency has experience working with children with special needs and does extensive background checks for anyone working one-on-one with a child with special needs. They will also be insured properly, and have state and federal regulations clearly met. Search for a provider that pairs a caregiver with your child’s specific needs, and also delivers a protective environment, developmentally-appropriate activities, and support that aligns with your child’s diagnosis.

If you do decide that a daycare center is the right fit for your special needs child, you have every right to one. The American Disabilities Act does not permit daycare centers to decline the admittance of a child due to a disability. Each daycare center must calculate the child’s individual necessities and arrange reasonable modifications, if possible.

But will your child benefit from a traditional daycare center, or one that focuses on special needs children? To determine the best fit, estimate your child’s capacity to communicate and socialize on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being very functional. If you feel your child is below five in many areas, you might want to look for a provider in your community who offers more specialized care.

As a parent, you want your special needs child to have the best in care and support. If you need help, our specialists can provide you with information about how to choose quality childcare, what you options are available to meet your needs, and other community resources to better assist you and your special needs child.

If you need help, please contact us.

American Advocacy Group is on the front lines every day, making positive change happen for people diagnosed with Autism, Down syndrome and a range of diagnoses across the continuum. As a leading advocate for all people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families, and the premier provider of the support and services people want and need, we understand the system and know how to take action in regard to your best interests.

CONTACT US FOR HELP.

Dial (877) 762-0702 or email us at [email protected]

How to File an IEP Violation Against my Child’s School

iep violation

 

 

 

 

If you are the parent of a child with autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or another disability, he or she may be eligible for special education services. But what if, after your child has been evaluated and receives an IEP (Individualized Education Program), your child still does not receive the attention or services he or she needs in school? If you cannot resolve the dispute by talking through the disagreement, The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) provides a formal way to make a complaint against the school. It is called a “due process” and it is the way you file an IEP violation against your child’s school.

A due process complaint is a letter filed by you, or someone on your behalf, when you disagree about whether your child was correctly determined to be disabled, whether he was evaluated properly, whether your child with special needs has been placed in the appropriate environment at school, or the provision of a free appropriate public education (FAPE) to your child was allocated.

Whenever a due process complaint is received, you and the local educational agency (LEA) involved in the dispute must have an opportunity for an impartial due process hearing. A due process hearing is a formal meeting held to resolve conflicts between parents and schools.

The Due Process Complaint Letter

  • Complaints must be written, signed, and include a statement that a public agency has violated a requirement of Part B of IDEA, as well as the facts upon which the statement is based
  • Complaints must include specific information. You may not have a hearing until you file a due process complaint that includes this information
  • You must provide a copy of the due process complaint letter to the school and forward a copy to the state educational agency
  • The information contained in the due process complaint must be kept confidential
  • There’s a time limit for filing a due process complaint

Information You Must Include in the Due Process Complaint Letter

  • Your child’s name
  • The address of your child’s residence
  • The name of the school your child is attending
  • A description of the issue your child is having related to the proposed action or refusal that’s causing the conflict, and facts upon which the complaint is based, and
  • A proposed resolution for the dispute

What Happens After You Submit the Due Process Complaint Letter

Within five days, a decision is made to determine whether the due process letter is legally sufficient and then you will be notified immediately in writing. If the hearing officer rules that the due process complaint is not sufficient, the decision will identify how the notice is insufficient so that you can amend the notice, if appropriate.

If the due process complaint is determined to be insufficient and is not amended, the due process complaint could be dismissed.

Due process takes time. If the situation isn’t resolved easily, you also may need an attorney or advocate. Understanding your legal rights and how due process works can help you decide if it’s the right path for you.

If you feel overwhelmed and you need help, please contact us.

American Advocacy Group is on the front lines every day, making positive change happen for people diagnosed with Autism, Down syndrome and a range of diagnoses across the continuum. As a leading advocate for all people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families, and the premier provider of the support and services people want and need, we understand the system and know how to take action in regard to your best interests.

CONTACT US FOR HELP.

Dial (877) 762-0702 or email us at [email protected]

 

How Long Can a Child Get Disability Benefits?

child with disability

 

 

 

When you are raising a child with a disability like autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or similar, it can be financially difficult. Over 40% of families with a child with a disability report experiencing significant financial stress. As many as 30% of parents of children with disabilities quit their jobs or significantly cut back in order to provide care for their child. This isn’t anything new to those of you who are experiencing these issues. That’s why it’s so important to find out how to get paid for raising a child with special needs. But how long can your child get disability benefits?

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Can I Get Financial Help for My Child with Cerebral Palsy?

cerebral palsy

 

 

 

 

Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability among children. The medical costs alone for children who have this disability are ten times higher than those of children who do not. It’s understandable then, that many families with a child with cerebral palsy experience significant financial stress. Many parents find that they cannot hold a full-time job at all. Can you get financial help for your child with cerebral palsy?

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What is Special Needs Financial Planning?

financial planning

 

 

 

 

Raising your child with special needs who will require lifelong support can be overwhelming, especially when you need to plan for them long term. There are legal and financial matters to consider, your child’s individual needs, and the effect all your decisions will have on everyone else in the family. And the costs associated with raising your child with a disability like autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or epilepsy are colossal. So what is the best way to go about financial planning for your child with special needs?

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