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3 Ways to Get Paid with a Financial Program in California

If your child has autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or another disability, he may be eligible for a financial program that offers benefits. In California, there are 3 programs that will pay you so you can stay home and take care of your child with special needs.

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How to Prepare for Your First IEP Meeting

 

If your child has autism, Down syndrome or another disability, he may be eligible for special education services. The school system is tough to navigate without some preparation. That’s why getting ready for your first IEP (Individualized Educational Program) meeting is an important step in managing your child’s education.

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How Do I File a Complaint Against the School for My Child with Special Needs?

If your child has autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or another disability, she may be eligible for special education services. But what if, after your child has been evaluated, you do not agree with the decision? If you cannot resolve the dispute by talking through the disagreement, The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) provides a formal way to make a complaint against the school. It is called “due process.”

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What Documentation Do I Need When I Apply for IHSS?

In Home Supportive Services (IHSS) is a program in California that provides payment to you as the caregiver for your child with special needs.

It can help you financially so you can stay home and take care of your child who has a disability like autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or epilepsy. You can now go to all the doctor appointments and therapies and personally supervise the services and monitor what your child receives without worrying about scheduling time off from work or taking a day without pay.

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How Do I Quit My Job to Take Care of My Child with Autism?

When your child is diagnosed with autism, life seems to go into overdrive. There are doctor’s appointments to arrange, therapists to visit, and school services to manage. There are books and websites to read, information to review, and changes to make at home. Perhaps most importantly, your time with your child suddenly becomes time for therapy. Instead of relaxing in front of the TV or hanging out in the backyard, you’re working with your child to build communication skills, social skills, and play skills.

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